[The Grass Dancer Books ] Free download as Epub author Susan Power – Epub and TXT


10 thoughts on “The Grass Dancer

  1. says:

    What I said in the secrecy of my thoughts was Fanny mazaska the white iron you call money is useless to me Even the goods I take from the sutler's store the flour coffee sugar and tobacco the knives and blankets are things I do not want I give them to my cousins who live upriverThese words belong to Red Dress ancestor of several members of Susan Power's wonderful cast who gives the novel a kind of foundation stone or pivot Her

  2. says:

    I loved this book and could hardly bear to put it down In fact it is now one of my favourite magic realist books which is saying a lot this is the 116th review on this blog There are some books that you should read in one sitting or as near to one as you can get This is one such book Each chapter in the book is almost a separate story narrated by different characters at different times it is important to make a note o

  3. says:

    This book follows the lives of various members of the Sioux Nation starting in the 1980s and going back into the 18 hundreds It was very inter

  4. says:

    I like the structure of the book the way the story was told in reverse Before reading the book I read that the story was multilayered and a bit complicated to follow but I disagree The story and characters were well develo

  5. says:

    A great read with Ms Power's wonderful storytelling

  6. says:

    This is a beautifully written book The magical realism the character development the lyricism are all fabulous I did occasionally have

  7. says:

    A terrific poetic and moving novel of resilience pride fear and raw human emotion Power’s prose is as smooth as velvet and her ability to weave a story and create such rich complex characters is fantastic The fantasy el

  8. says:

    Right from the beginning I knew that Susan Power's The Grass Dancer was a book I never would have picked up on my own Though I'm generally up

  9. says:

    Dreams medicine and ceremony are integral parts of The Grass Dancer Susan Power writes with carefully executed intensity in each of her haunting stories which are all set on the same North Dakota reservationIt took a little while to become fully immersed but once there I was swept away by Power’s stark and confident prose We are gifted a plethora of uniue and fully fleshed characters but Mercury Thunder an elder who

  10. says:

    Two young Sioux—Harley Wind Soldier and Charlene Thunder—try to figure who they are and what love means to them on a North Dakota reservation Their family histories create a tapestry of possibilities ways of living with loss an

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Read ✓ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF Ç Susan Power

The Grass Dancer

From the lore of her people the Sioux Power has forged a consummate work of the imagination Set on a North I loved this book and could hardly bear to put it down In fact it is now one of my favourite magic realist books which is saying a lot this is the 116th review on this blog There are some books that you should read in one sitting or as near to one as you can get This is one such book Each chapter in the book is almost a separate story narrated by different characters at different times it is important to make a note of the year that appears under each chapter heading This patchwork of stories comes together to form the larger picture This structure is why it is important to read the book rapidly because you can lose your way if you take too long I felt very much that I was dreaming when I read the book experiencing a series of instances visions references that came in and out of focus until at last they formed one vision Dreaming and visions are at the heart of this book The full story of Red Dress does not come until towards the end of the book but she appears in the dreams and visions of the characters throughout the book I read somewhere that that is how Susan Power got the idea for the book the woman in a red dress appeared to her The line between the real and the dream is constantly blurring Which is real the dream or the waking Power makes it clear how central dreams were and are to Sioux culture I can t help thinking that they should be important to the culture of the white man and woman in my case It seems to me that we have lost something when we forgot to take our dreamworld as seriously as our waking There are some memorable characters in this book the most notable being the awful and awesome Anna Mercury Thunder She could so easily have been a stereotype but Power gives her a back story that shows that she was not always the witch she becomes and also explains why she changed Of course the book s structure of telling characters stories in reverse makes the revelation of Anna Thunder s past tragedy all the strongerIf I have one criticism it is that there are perhaps too many characters to keep track of especially as the book s chronology jumps about so much One of the reasons for my confusion was that the storyline is structured almost as a series of variations on a theme with incidents reappearing through the generations In this I was reminded of Alan Garner s books which so influenced me as a child and which also feature legends that reappear in the present dayI have read a number of excellent magic realist books dealing with the complexity of life of modern Native Americans in a predominantly white society but none have shown mixed marriages and mixed parentage as this book does The different generations apart from Red Dress s all feature inter race relationships And yet this book shows the native magic as very much a part of accepted everyday life On the reservation magic just happens and everyone accepts it This is contrasted with the attitude of the white schoolteacher who comes to live with and study Anna Thunder Despite being around Anna and supposedly respecting Sioux heritage and culture she is shocked and scared when she realizes that Anna can actually work her magic As Anna affirms I am not a fairytale No Anna you are not and nor are your beliefs and nor is magic realismThis review first appeared on

Review The Grass Dancer

Dakota reservation this story spins a myriad of folk motifs into the fabric of reality giving readers a n This is a beautifully written book The magical realism the character development the lyricism are all fabulous I did occasionally have trouble keeping up with who was who in the sectional changes but not enough to effect my rating

Read ✓ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF Ç Susan Power

Arrative about the connection among generations how the actions of ancestors can affect a contemporary lif Right from the beginning I knew that Susan Power s The Grass Dancer was a book I never would have picked up on my own Though I m generally up for reading about any culture I ve been burned by a couple about Native Americans so I m hesitant to read them Still that s not something I m proud of and is certainly no reason to write off all of those books so when this showed up in Sadie Hawkins I figured I d give it a try While I didn t precisely dislike The Grass Dancer I didn t really like it either and I definitely did not understand itThe Grass Dancer is a strange novel from a narrative perspective Power uses multiple perspectives varying from chapter to long chapter Some of the perspectives are in third person and others in first Since I read the book in chunks by chapter seriously they re long I can t say for sure how uniue the voices are in the first person chapters but it pretty much all read like the same narrator to me As such I found the shifts in narration confusingShifting from third to first person isn t all that weird though Plenty of books do that What not as many books do is jump around in time while switching perspectives The book opens with no year ascribed then goes to 1981 From there the narrative keeps jumping backwards years at a time all the way to 1935 at which point it finally hops back to the early 1980s WHUTEach chapter is a somewhat self contained narrative and taken individually some of them were uite interesting and would have made decent books if built out Both the 1981 story involving Pumpkin one of the only female grass dancers and one of the best regardless of gender and the 1964 story about Crystal Thunder which is about her falling in love with a white man Race and culture and identity and romance are the main themes and I m totally all for that Some of the other narratives the one of Red Dress most especially bored meTaken as a whole though I have no freaking clue what to make of this book Why did it go backward Why make it so difficult for me to piece together how everyone s related To follow this I would have had to build out a family tree and keep track of names As it is I think I got the broad strokes but missed the subtle impacts the earlier timelines had on the later Having finished I really have no clue what I was meant to get out of this novel What I consider the main plot the frame story seems to me unresolved and unsatisfying Basically I just don t get it So there you go I don t think this was a book for me and I don t think I did it justice because I am baffled

  • Hardcover
  • 300
  • The Grass Dancer
  • Susan Power
  • English
  • 02 July 2019
  • 9780399139116

About the Author: Susan Power

Susan Power is a Standing Rock Sioux author from Chicago She earned her bachelor's degree from Harvard University and a JD from Harvard Law School After a short career in law she decided to become a writer starting her career by earning an MFA from the Iowa Writer's WorkshopHer fellowships include an Iowa Arts Fellowship James Michener Fellowship Radcliffe Bunting Institute Fellowship Prin